1.0 digital era.2.0 Research questionsHas the Internet become

1.0 IntroductionWith the gradual penetration of Internet into all aspects of human life, all aspects of information are more easily to get, information is more transparent. Social groups are connected through the Internet, the boundaries of various classes are being broken down or disappeared, and people demand more respect, call for equal treatment and require democracy and freedom. With the Internet as a basic tool, everyone can contribute to democracy, the power of democracy is exerted through the Internet, the power of democracy is growing, and media liberalism is realized through the power of the Internet. Therefore, in our research, we will find the evidences to prove that the Internet is a democratization tool and focus on the ways Internet can be used to promote democracy in the big background of liberty in a digital era.2.0 Research questionsHas the Internet become a democratization tool?In which ways can it be used to promote democracy? 3.0 Research objectivesTo identify if the Internet has become a democratization toolTo describe the ways can be used to promote democracy by the InternetTo determine in which ways can Internet be used to promote democracy in different countriesTo estimate what degree of democracy can be promoted by the InternetTo compare the degree of democracy promoted by the Internet in different countriesTo analyze the condition for democracy promoted by the Internet in different countriesTo collect proof to prove that the Internet is a democratization tool4.0 Expected outcomesInternet has become a democratization tool in many countries. The Internet’s ability to enhance political debate, mobilization and participation can be used to promote democracy ( Hoff, 2006, p41). Besides, the development of globalization caused by the Internet makes the free flow of information. And the free information makes the efficient spread of more democratic information.(Best & Wade, 2009). Education and middle class was the crucial aspects (Chen, 2013, p45). The political realities of a democratic society will manifest themselves only if democracy is cultivated and nurtured at the grassroots, which is, established from the ground up in schools, families and the wider communities (Loo, 2007, p14). The democratic effects of the Internet can only work when it is approved by the country’s authorities, the public culture and people’s active political engagement. And it uses the Internet as the medium.(Loo, 2007).If the government can filter the content on the Internet and remove the ‘undesirable’ ideologies which are recognized to be wrong universally, then to some extent, democracy can be achieved.5.0 Significance of researchThe need for democracy caused by the Internet has become a kind of pressure and responsibility for the government, and affects the making of policies, and these are precisely the significant impact that Internet has brought to the world. The Internet connects the world together, making the flow of information more real-time and smart and making people do the proper thing at the right time. With the Internet as a basic tool, everyone can contribute to democracy, the power of democracy is exerted through the Internet, the power of democracy is growing, and media liberalism is realized through the power of the Internet.6.0 Discussion6.1 The ways Internet uses to promote democracyThe key impact of the Internet on democracy follows from its ability to enhance political debate, mobilization and participation. The Internet is said to be providing radically new forms of information access and dissemination that are critical for the active participation of citizens in the political arena. As political participation, especially in participatory theories of democracy, is a measure of democratic politics, the Internet thus becomes a major tool for democratization (Hoff, 2006, p41).(Thiagu, 2000) suggests that the Internet provides people a new way to spread and get information, which is crucial to the effectiveness of democracy. It is founded on the idea that globalization and globalized markets largely facilitated and accelerated by the Internet force governments to keep their countries’ communication borders open. The consequent free flow of information allows for the efficient passage of more “democratic” information (Best & Wade, 2009, p256). 6.2 The precondition for Internet as democracy toolThe single most important question to ask about the role of the Internet in emerging democracies is the extent to which the Internet serves the democratic aspirations of the citizens of these countries (Zaid, 2016, p50).Whether the civic awareness and potential to promote democracy of the Internet can be achieved depends on the user of the Internet. So the Internet is only a tool for its user. The democratic effects of the Internet can only work when it is approved by the country’s authorities, the public culture and people’s active political engagement. And it uses the Internet as the medium (Loo, 2007).According to philosopher John Dewey, the political reality of democratic society can only be built on the basics of the organizations like schools, families and big communities. And the culture of freedom made by the things mentioned above can save the political reality of democracy (Loo, 2007). (Chen, 2013, p45) believed education and middle class was the crucial aspects. 6.3 The content on the Internet need to be filtered(Best & Wade, 2009, p255) show that some regions do not enjoy a positive Internet/democracy correlation suggesting that the Internet can be used both as a tool for democratization as well as an instrument for authoritarianism.For government, the Internet has its good effect, it offers a free marketplace for idea. But it also has its bad effect, it leads to bad ideology, which means the government need to widen the scale of censorship, firewalls and data filters(Loo, 2007).(Thiagu, 2000)warns that for country, the important thing is to control the content spread by the Internet.They can control what kind of information that is being shared and Internet is simply just another tool to spread information, argues (Chen, 2013, p43).If the government can filter the content on the Internet and remove the ‘undesirable’ ideologies which is recognized to be wrong universally, then to some extent, democracy can be achieved.6.4 World overviewWhile this global dimension of the Internet can indeed contribute to the democratization process, it has to be contextualized and examined within specific national contexts (Hoff, 2006, p30).6.4.1 AfricaFor Sub-Saharan Africa, the analysis reveals a close alignment between ICTs and democratization. But the Internet is primarily used by the elite (Akpan-Obong, Alozie, & Foster, 2010, p2).For African countries dealing with unique and increasingly complicated political and socio-economic issues, the Internet provides a platform from which citizens can now address these issues themselves and, in doing so, contribute to a public sphere that strengthens the democratic fiber of their countries (Van Rensburg, 2012, p93).It is glad to see that the Kenyan government has recently given priority to ICTs for the promotion of democracy in recognition of the important role it can play. Several projects have been launched in support of government objectives to enable all citizens to be part of a political and public sphere (Van Rensburg, 2012, p110). 6.4.2 AsiaAsian nations can be considered generally as fledgling democracies and the advent of the Internet definitely has varying possibilities and implications on the polity of these nations (Hoff, 2006, p22).(Thiagu, 2000) states that the conflict between the active supporters of democratic society and opponents who has political authority and power is one of the important theme of today’s Asia and this situation will last for decades.6.4.2.1 ChinaFor China, information on the Internet is still subjected to censorship for the Chinese citizens today (Chen, 2013, p5).6.4.2.2 MalaysiaIt is still too early to say whether the Internet has become a successful alternative public sphere in Malaysia. But since the arrest of Anwar Ibrahim, an important political leader in Malaysia, there are signs to suggest that the Internet has promoted the increase of political activism among some Malaysians(Thiagu, 2000). 6.4.2.3 KoreaThe varied forms of online media that have developed in the past several years in Korea are helping to nourish a new form of democracy, participatory democracy. Participatory democracy, in turn, is helping to foster the continuing development and spread of the internet in Korea. The continuing development of the internet and of the netizens protects and nurtures new online forms that have become a new institution for the continuing struggle to maintain and extend democracy (Hauben, 2014, p37).6.4.3 Egypt (Arab area)Although it is also still too early to estimate the influence of the Internet on Egypt and the Arab world.(Abdulla, 2005) believe the Internet as a new medium has provided opportunity for the change in political area, the society to make a more active civic society.It can be said that the free flow of information promoted by the Internet can force the political leaders of Arab to be more open and let their country have more freedom of speech. In other words, the free flow of information can destroy censorship system and lead to a more active public sphere and finally influence the making of political decision. Therefore, the access to the Internet will make the media become more free and diverse and lead to a more democratic, unfocused and open political system (Abdulla, 2005).The member of the Egyptian government’s awareness of the potential of the Internet to develop the society is an advantage for Egyptian government(Abdulla, 2005).Egypt now has potential to become the information technology center and finally become a model for politics and civic participation in the Arab world. For Egypt has a new government who believes that information technology is important and has potential(Abdulla, 2005).However, the 2013 and 2014 reports show that the Arab countries use almost all types of Internet control. The reports found that surveillance was the most significant trend. On a global scale, the report also found that 35 of the 60 countries that were assessed had widened and reinforced their technical or legal surveillance powers over the 2-year period (Zaid, 2016, p57).6.5 LimitationMany of these studies have essentially extrapolated the democratizing properties of the Internet from its technical characteristics (Hoff, 2006, p22). Most studies on the democratic potential of the Internet reveal significant theoretical gaps and recent experiences of the political impact of the Internet in Asia cannot be understood without a thorough contextualization of the analysis (Hoff, 2006, p23). Case study and large amount of theoretical analyses almost takes up the early studies of the influence of Internet on democracy(Best & Wade, 2009).BibliographyChen, F. (2013). Internet and Democracy– A study of the Internet’s influence in China. Huddinge Municipality: Södertörn University.Hauben, R. (2014). 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