ABSTRACT in itself but a means to produce

ABSTRACT                  

The
next decade will likely witness a considerable rise in physical programmable
interactive artifacts. Sensors, devices, platforms, and frameworks have become
more accessible, by the proliferation of mobile technologies, the growth of the
do-it-yourself (DIY). One class of artistic physical interactive objects is the
digital musical instrument (DMI). DMIs are devices in which gestural control
and sound production are physically decoupled but digitally connected according
to a mapping strategy. Sensors translate gestures into digital data that can
then be processed and mapped to sound synthesis algorithms or modules. DMI
design and implementation encompass several issues. One is that because of the
soundcontrol dissociation, there are no mechanical or physical constraints, so
DMI designers have more freedom than builders of acoustic instruments..

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Keywords:
DMI, Sensor, DAW , Ablenton, Arduino.

 

I.                  
INTRODUCTION

Here,
we present works related to notable points, regarding the initial path for idea
generation, we analyze conceptual frameworks in the digital musical instrument
(DMI) literature. Concerning prototyping, we cite a list of existing tools and
the impact of

 

 

 

 

integrating them into
prototyping cycles. Initial Path for Idea Generation: There have been numerous
initiatives to build a body of knowledge about DMI design by attempting to
explain a device’s components and their interrelationships. Various conceptual
frameworks attempt to rationalize DMI design. Such frameworks are necessary to
reduce the complexity of DMI design space, but initial explorative paths in a
“generative” framework might help kick start new DMI projects. Sensors translate gestures into
digital data that can then be processed and mapped to sound synthesis.The DMI
is not an end in itself but a means to produce music, the DMI cannot be
properly evaluated without being played.For making this instrument or probatio
we are going to make following blocks i.e fretless, turntable, bellows,
buttons, crank.

The
blocks are connected to the base via spring-loaded pins and are held in place
by a set of four magnets.Probatio block has its own microcontroller that
communicates with a central hub through a wired connection.DMI prototypes
should be functional and react to a player’s movements in real time hence it is
designed in a block format.

 

 Prototyping
Tools: There are a considerable number of tools that can be used to build
functional DMI prototypes. For example, common tools useful in DMI development
include microcontroller environments like Arduino, Rasberry-pi, 8051 etc.
sensor kits (Tactile switch, Ulta-sound sensor, Potentiometer, Piezo-sensor);
and software

 

 

frameworks,
such as audio-oriented programming languages (CSound, Super Collider, Chuck,
Pure Data, and Max/MSP), mapping applications (libmap per, iCon, OSCulator, and
juxion), and digital audio work- stations (Logic Pro, Ableton Live, Pro Tools,
Garage Band, Reaktor, and Tassman). Our project provides a modular environment
where users can make functional DMI prototypes by combining parts of existing
instrument controls and supports, following the morphological chart approach.
It attempts to provide designers with examples and directions to aid in the
conception of new ideas. It also aims to reduce the gap between an idea and its
working prototype. We expect

 

that
a designer can use the system to communicate more effectively with a performer,
and a designer-performer can more easily explore new ideas. We choose to
explore the familiarity and gestural inheritance of existing acoustic music
instruments as an initial constraint to ignite the creative process for new
instrument ideas. Although
the resulting instruments won’t be structurally or gesturally restricted by
acoustic laws, this approach could serve as trial and error method to explore
and generate ideas to create music. To allow the combination of atomic elements
based on ways of
controlling sound and holding the instrument, we chose a method for generating
alternatives that appears to be adequate for our context: the morphological
chart. This method consists of a matrix in which existing devices are split
into their fundamental parts and then recombined to generate new ideas.

                  MOTIVATION

The
main objective of this project is to provide instrument players a alternative
or a way to play many instruments sound in one instrument.This will provide
players a easy way to access a lot of instruments. It will be

 

 

 

easy
to handle and carry because it can be dismantled.Different kinds of sound of
different instruments can be played in one system only.We are using different
kinds of sensors like piezo sensor, potentiometer and etc. We will be using
loop MIDI for programming.

Arduino
is used for interfacing. The next decade will likely witness a considerable
rise in physical programmable interactive artifacts. Experimentation with
sensors and actuators are still going on to program the physical world beyond
the screen.

 

             SCOPE OF THE PROJECT

DMI
design and implementation encompass several issues. One is that because of the
sound- control dissociation there are no mechanical or physical constraints so
DMI designers have more freedom than builders of acoustic instruments.

 

 

In
addition the cycle of exploring new ideas and transforming them into prototypes
is an important part of the design process.

we
focus on two questions that address the conception and implementation of DMIs:
How can we provide an initial exploratory path for generating new DMI ideas,
effort needed to build functional DMI prototypes.

The
multiple input output combinations increase the complexity of the design
process and can lead to creative paralysis hence this type of instrument is
designed.

 

 

II.               
LITERATURE SURVEY

1.
B. Buxton, “Artists and the Art of the Luthier,” The Artist’s View column
continues t questioning the creative role that computer graphics is playing by
giving artists from several fields a forum in which to present their views on
Art, Computer Graphics and Entertainment. Additional information about
flipbooks is known through this paper

 

 

 

2.
F. Morreale, A. De Angeli, and S. O’Modhrain, “Musical Interface Design: An
ExperienceOriented Framework ”  

 The purpose of studying this paper was to know
structure and some information about morphology and musical instruments.

3.
J. Malloch, S. Sinclair, and M.M. Wanderle, “Distributed Tools for Interactive
Design of Heterogeneous Signal Networks, Multimedia Tools and Applications” This
paper was referred to know about programming and design.

4.
J. Barbosa et al , “What Does ‘Evaluation’ Mean for the NIME Community? Proc.
Int’l Conf. New Interfaces for Musical Expression” The purpose of studying this
paper was to know structure and some information about morphology and musical
instruments.

5.A.
Hunt, M. M. Wanderley, and M. Paradis, “The Importance of Parameter Mapping in
Electronic Instrument Design Proc. Int’l Conf. New Interfaces for Musical
Expression” We have learned from this paper how electronic design is done.

6.
A. Tanaka et al.,” A Survey and Thematic Analysis IEEE MultiMedia Approach as
Input to the Design of Mobile Music 70 GUIs Proc. Int’l Conf. New Interfaces
for Musical Expression” We referred it for knowing details about music design.

7.
P. Helminen, J. Ainoa, and S. M€akinen.,” Designing User Innovation Toolkits:
Exploring the Interrelation between Solution Space and Module Library Int’l J.
Design Creativity and Innovation” The main purpose of this paper was to know
toolkit and designing.

8.
J. Sadler etal.,” Building Blocks of the Maker Movement: Modularity Enhances
Creative Confidence during Prototyping” This paper was referred for
understanding the techniques and methods of prototyping. We referred it to
understand how the blocks of dmi is to be made.

 

9.
R. Medeiros et al., “Challenges in Designing New Interfaces for Musical
Expression,” Design, User Experience, and Usability: Theories, Methods, and
Tools for Designing the User Experience” This paper was referred for knowing
interfacing and designing of different musical expressions.

10.
S. Huot, “Designeering Interaction: A Missing Link in the Evolution of
HumanComputer Interaction, Universite Paris Sud—Paris XI” The purpose of
referring this paper is to understand about sound generation and morphology.

 

III.            
METHODOLOGY

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Block diagram of digital musical
instrument (DMI)

 

Explanation: (A)Sensors: First part of this
project is sensors which are used for production of different kinds of sound of
different instruments We will be using different kinds of sensors for different
sound production like:

   1. Piezo sensor

 

 

2. Force sensor and etc.

(B) Microcontroller(Arduino): arduino is
used for coding purpose and serial transmission of data to loop midi and then
to ablenton. (C)Loop midi: loop midi is the software which we are using for
coding purpose and it acts as a source or connection between arduino and
ablenton, Digital audio workstation(DAW): DAW we are using is ablenton. Which
converts normal sound into digital form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2:
Morphological chart

 

Two basic aspects of the instrument-player relation
were considered in our study: the way the player holds the instrument and the
way he or she controls the sound. The current version of the proposed
morphological chart, comprising seven supports (elements that provide support,
related to the holding of the instrument) and nine controls (ways of
controlling sound), which represent a subset of the possible supports and
controls The morphological chart consists of functions (rows) and options
(columns). To achieve a given combination of controls, one can trace a

 

 

path on the chart. The first row contains devices that
are intentionally represented as generic blank objects to highlight the way
they’re held. The next three rows contain three groups of control functions
(excitation, modification, and selection). We decided to build a prototyping
toolkit with which the user could rapidly construct and test ideas based on the
inheritable elements typology

 

 

 

 

Figure 3: Digital
musical instrument (probatio)

 

This
instrument uses the guitar inspired compound base with five controllers:
bellows, buttons, fretless, turntable, and crank. The name of this instrument
is probatio.The ?rst functional prototype of Probatio comprises two bases
(elements that can be held) and ?ve blocks (control elements). Two bases are
there in this prototype. First base has 4 blocks and second base is in three by
three square grid.

The
four slots and three by three bases can be combined to create a compound base
inspired by guitar. This project can be dismantled. In this system we are using
piezo sensors, potentiometer and etc. for producing sound of different
instruments.

 

 

IV.             
RESULTS & DISCUSSIONS

This
project is to provide instrument players a alternative or a way to play many
instruments sound in one instrument Instrument players doesn’t have an access
to a different instruments at the same time hence such system is designed DMI
design and implementation encompass several issues. One

 

 

is
that because of the soundcontrol dissociation, there are no mechanical or
physical constraints, so DMI designers have more freedom than builders of
acoustic instruments. The multiple input output combinations increase the complexity
of the design process hence increases cost. This project helps us to reduce
this long process in a short one. As it helps in:

1.
Reduce time consumption.

 

 

2.
This project is a cost efficient project.

3.
Today’s current scenario is digital musical instruments are available but this
system can be dismantled and instrumentalist can have access to different
instruments.

 

V.                
CONCLUSION

From this project
we have learned that different types of electronic sensors can be used for the
production of musical sounds of different instruments. This project also gave
us a brief idea about morphology. We came to know about Digital Audio Workstation(DAW)
like ablenton, which is used for sound recording and processing. We are using
software loop MIDI, which will be in connection to DAW. And it acts as a
connection between arduino and DAW.

 

 

VI.             
REFERENCES

1.Filipe
Calegario, Marcelo M. Wanderley, Stephane Huot, Giordano Cabral, Geber Ramalho,
“A Method and Toolkit for Digital Musical Instruments: Generating Ideas
and Prototypes”, IEEE MultiMedia, vol. 24, no. , pp. 63-71, Jan.-Mar.
2017, doi:10.1109/MMUL.2017.18

 

2. Parimala
Gandhi, A. S. Vijayan,” Various feasible maneuvers for the analysis of an image
for retrieval of information and optimization”, “, IEEE MultiMedia, 19-19
Nov. 2016, DOI: 10.1109/GET.2016.7916748

 

 

 

3. P. Helminen, J.
Ainoa, and S. M€akinen, “Designing User Innovation Toolkits: Exploring the
Interrelation between Solution Space and Module Library,” Int’l J IEEE
MultiMedia., May 2015, pp. 1–19; http://doi.org/10.1080/21650349.2015.1043351.

 

4. J. Barbosa et
al., “Designing DMIs for Popular Music in the Brazilian Northeast: Lessons
Learned,” Proc. Int’l Conf. IEEE MultiMedia New Interfaces for Musical
Expression, 2015, pp. 277–280. 13. http://doi.org/10.1080/21650349. 2015.1045257

 

5. J. Malloch, S.
Sinclair, and M.M. Wanderley, “Distributed Tools for Interactive Design of
Heterogeneous Signal Networks,” Multimedia Tools and Applications, IEEE
MultiMedia vol. 72, no. 15, 2014, pp. 5683–5707;http://doi.org/10.1007/s11042-014-1878–5.

 

 6. A. Tanaka et al., “A Survey and
Thematic Analysis Approach as Input to the Design of Mobile Music 70 GUIs,”
Proc. Int’l Conf. IEEE MultiMedia New Interfaces for Musical Expression, 2012;http://vhosts.eecs.umich.edu/
nime2012//Proceedings/papers/240 Final Manuscript.pdf

 

7. B.
Buxton, “Artists and the Art of the Luthier,” ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics,
IEEE MultiMedia vol. 31, no.1, 1997, pp. 10–11; http://doi.org/10.1145/248307.
248315.

 

8. T.
Magnusson, “Designing Constraints:Composing and Performing with Digital Musical
Systems,” Computer Music J., IEEE MultiMedia vol. 34, no. 4, 2010, pp. 62–74; http://doi.org/10.1162/COMJ
a 00026.

 

9. L. Dahl,
“Designing New Musical Interfaces as Research: What’s the Problem?”

Leonardo, IEEE
MultiMedia vol. 49, no. 1, 2016, pp. 76–77; http://doi.org/10.1162/ LEON a
01118.

 

10. S.K. Card,
J.D. Mackinlay, and G.G. Robertson, “A Morphological Analysis of the Design
Space of Input Devices,” ACM Trans. Information Systems, IEEE MultiMedia vol.
9, no. 2, 1991, pp. 99–122. http://doi.org/10. 1145/123078.128726.